ENCHANTED INDIA

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A complete sensory experience: get pampered – luxury spas, Ayurveda and Yoga

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Mystical moments with the Grey Ghost of the Himalayas
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Enchanted India – Luxury Tours India  | Escorted Bird Tours

India – the land of over a billion people, where humans have been living for close to 75000 years. It is a country with over 780 languages, 645 tribes and 9 religions; one that stretches from the Lofty Himalayas to the Islands of the Indian Ocean, and offers something for everyone. To embark on a discovery of India is to set out on an adventure of a lifetime to a destination that enthralls, enchants, and will keep you coming back for more. From ancient traditions to modern culture, extravagant accommodation to opulent history, art, music, food, wildlife, adventure sports and photographic explorations – let us take you on a journey…. Enchanted India helps you to plan your holiday to India and to special destinations worldwide. We make your dream vacation come true and help you go beyond your imagination with unique experiences and exceptional itineraries crafted just for you. With our team of travel experts with unmatched destination expertise, we work with you to plan the most complex itineraries down to tiniest detail. All to give you the holiday of a lifetime. India Birding Tours, Wildlife Tours, Luxury Tours – all are tours are bespoke. We have a special affinity to India Birding Tours.

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Come of our popular sections: Luxury Tours India  | Escorted Bird Tours

Kerala Backwaters

Alluring Backwaters and so much more

Get an audience with royalty

Tracking tigers on Elephant back or in open 4WD jeeps
Pushkar Camel Fair

Pushkar Fair

The Pushkar Fair (Pushkar Camel Fair) is an annual five-day camel and livestock fair. It is the biggest camel fair in the world.
Cooking indian food

Indian Cooking Tours

Learn to cook indian food from Indians

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Private holidays with your own Villa, swimming pool and staff

Himalayan Grey Ghost

The quest for the Snow Leopard

Scuba Diving Vacations

We are a PADI Dive Center, SSI Platinum Instructor Training Facility based in the Andaman Islands, India.

Northern Lights (aurora borealis)

Soak in a hot tub and enjoy the Northern Lights in Iceland

Varanasi

The holy ghats of Varanasi

Birdwatching India with the Best

Tailor-made Bird Holidays

Luxury in the land of the Maharajas

Explore the fascinating lives of the Royal Families

Africa on Safari

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Great Indian Bustard surviving in the wild

Number of Tigers in India

Bird Species in India

Years In Business

If you are looking for an escorted holiday to India, if it’s a bird tour or tiger tour or photo tour you wish to organize – you have come to the perfect place!

At Enchanted India we have packaged our passion for all things Indian – wildlife, heritage, culture, landscapes, colour scapes, food – and would like to share it with you! Our CEO Nikhil Devasar with his multifarious interests in Indian birds (he founded delhibird the India Bird Network and furthermore organised the first Indian Bird Fair); While in Indian Wildlife – he has authored numerous books on Tigers and Birds; photography – in addition he is the Leica brand ambassador in India – has personally traveled the length and breadth of our country and now shares his wealth of experience with you, to give you the perfect holiday in Enchanted India!

So if its tigers, Asiatic lions, snow leopards and leopards you want to see in their habitat, we organize a special Big Cat tour at the best time of the year so as to maximize your chances. If you would like to tick off endemic birds of the Andamans, the elusive Bustards and desert birds of the Kutch, the colourful songbirds of the North-east and Bhutan, we almost know which tree they are sitting on or which bush they hide under and have the best most, experienced guides to accompany you. If photography is your passion the landscapes of Ladakh, the perfect symmetrical beauty of the Taj, the vibrancy of everyday Indian life will have you shooting every minute. If its adventure and experiences you search join the colourful melee of the Pushkar Animal Fair, river raft in the rapids of the holy Ganges, chant with the evening prayers at Varanasi, dive in the clear blue warm waters of the Andaman sea, find peace and do yoga in the Himalayas….it would take a life time to get to know India!

So make a start, choose your Indian dream and we will make it a reality. Enchanted India awaits you.

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Testimonials
Happy customers.
thumb_01_60_60Name

@sub-heading

On 29 and 30 November 2012, I had two of the greatest days of birding near Delhi, India.  I had four days between a Birding Ecotours trip to Bhutan and Assam, India, and a Rockjumper tour to Northern India.  I asked Chris Lotz, Birding Ecotours, to arrange a couple of days birding with a local guide.  Chris suggested his ground agent, Nikhil Devasar, Enchanted India.  What a great choice.  Nikhil arranged for me to stay at the Express Sarovar Portico, Surajkund, Delhi NCR.  He picked me up at 0600 on 29 November and we headed for Gurgaon.  I was in good hands.  As we left the main road south, Nikhil asked if I liked Neil Diamond and I replied “yes.”  He punched a few buttons and out from the speakers came “Sweet Caroline.”  He did not know that the Boston Red Sox baseball team plays that song at the bottom of the eighth inning. A tradition most sox fans might consider a rally song (except for last year – but I digress).  We turned into the parking lot at National Park Sultanpur.  We were met by his local guide, Sunjay.  After paying the foreigner entry ticket and parking (50 rupees), I received Book No. 418, Ticket No. 000001 which might have been an omen.  We walked about 100 yards and found a Brook’s Leaf Warbler that has a flycatcher type foraging habit.  About another 100 yards later, Nikhil found a small flock of Sind Sparrow, a recent arrival near Delhi with a few small isolated flocks in the area.  We than walked around a large pond and Sunjay found a White-tailed Lapwing.  Just for good measure a Common Snipe worked out behind the lapwing, not a lifer but the best view of a bird usually seen flying away.  It was about 0730 and we were back in the car.  From here, I have no idea of the locations visited; however, we were at one point 200 miles from Delhi.

Next stop was in a small village were the Bank Myna was along the roadside.  The first one was beside a Common Myna for good comparison.  A short distance later, Nikhil found a Brown Rock (Indian) Chat that flew up on a roof and quickly disappeared from view.  Minutes later we had a few on roadside wires.  We then traveled a few kilometers and turned into a cultivated area.  Nikhil spotted a Desert Wheatear.  He thought I t was not on my want list but he was mistaken.  We were looking for the Variable Wheatear in the same location.  We found this bird a few minutes later.  Two new wheatears located in the same set of plowed ground.  The next bird proved a little harder.  We drove up on a partially constructed bridge approach for a future road.  We searched but could not locate the bird.  Driving down the edge of the ramp and onto the existing highway, Nikhil spotted a raptor being mobbed by crows.  A quick turn onto a farm road.  We located the raptor sitting in a tree with several crows around it.  A Long-legged Buzzard showed fine in the tree then left to go to the area of the bridge approach from which we had just left.

After about an hour drive including a stop to purchase a cooking item for Shelly Bell (and a couple for me), we turned onto a side road.  Nikhil stopped the car and said, “Look on the top of the abandoned building.  The building was about ten feet high with a flat roof of twenty by fifty feet.  I looked like many of the chicken raising buildings we saw on the way.  There, sitting under the branch of a tree, was an Indian Stone Curlew.  At the side of the building under the same tree were two or three more.  I crossed the street to get a view onto the roof using a water storage tank for elevation.  I counted eight more curlews on the roof.  Nikhil thought there were probably thirty at this location.

Another drive found us at a bridge over a deep canal.  The berm was twenty feet above the water level with the width perhaps fifty feet.   Sunjay walked ahead and talked with a goat herder.  Shortly, a large brown bird crossed the canal.  Nikhil told me to watch the canal as the bird usually fly just above the water.  This bird might have seen us standing on the berm.  Instead of flying along the water, it flew behind trees on the opposite shore.  I saw the bird cross the canal and got looks as it passed.  It was a big owl now called the Rock Eagle Owl.  Sunjay flushed another that behaved properly, flying down the canal.  It landed in a large tree and stayed while we got scope views of it.  A great sight.

We drove many miles then made a turn onto a road beside an irrigation canal. I heard Nikhil and Sunjay mention grass and I thought they were talking about a grassbird, which I had not seen.  We left the car and walked a few feet when Nikhil said there is another new bird for me.  It was not a grassbird, rather a Streaked Weaver.  We walked a few more yards and down the embankment looking for the next bird.  Nikhil found it and again I expected a grassbird, but instead only saw a prinia.  There were Ashy and Plain Prinia about the edge of the grasses, but I still expected a grassbird.  The bird I saw was a prinia but not one of the two I had previously mentioned.  This bird was a little smaller than the other two.  While I was expecting a grassbird, the new bird was a Graceful Prinia.

We returned to National Park Sultanpur to drop off Sunjay.  A great day of birding and it was just after 1300.  Nikhil said there were no new birds for me in the area, we swept the board clean. Nikhil asked where I wanted to go for lunch.  I mentioned McDonald’s.  He said “OK.”  Later we actually drove to a three or four story shopping mall and there was the McDonald’s.   A great day of birding was capped by a visit to Mickey D’s.  It does not get any better.  But there was the next day.

Nikhil picked me up at 0715 and we headed toward the center of Delhi.  We crossed a river and went into the entrance of a bird sanctuary.   I have a piece of paper that says “Foreigner Ticket” that cost 350 rupees, but I cannot read any of the other words in Hindi.  Nikhil stopped the car a few hundred yards along the bank of the river/marsh and said there is your next bird.  On a transmission pylon was a Barbary Falcon, the only one known to be in the Delhi area.  We drove to the end of the road and parked.  We walked down to the reed bed and Nikhil said there is your next new bird.  It looked like a large grassbird, yes; it was still on my mind.  A grassbird with a ratty tail turned out to be a Striated Babbler.  The next bird took a long time to find.  As we walked along the path in the reeds, the footing got very muddy and we were not able to go to the normal location for the bird.  We walked additional paths, scanning the top of the reeds.  We ended up at a rickety watchtower that gave us a view of the marsh.  I was able to locate a female on the top of the reeds.  It was the White-tailed Stonechat that we were searching for.  Was it luck or good guiding?

When we got back to the car, Nikhil asked if I wanted to go on a wild goose chase.  I had no goose on my want list but I asked why not, perhaps it will be the grassbird. We drove onto an area where sand extraction was occurring.  Not your normal sand pit, rather an unorganized group of small operations with manpower rather than machines.  I did not see a pay loader anywhere.  Nikhil told me this area was the best place to see shorebirds on the mud flats in the river and along the shore.  Today, it is a dump.  We were looking for Sand Lark, and right in the midst of big trucks and many workers we found two, perhaps the last holdouts from days gone by.

We then visited a research area near my hotel.  It is a thorn forest with rock outcrops.  This area is the only such habitat near Delhi.  We flushed a pair of Painted Sandgrouse that landed a short distance away so we could get another look.  It turns out to be a new bird for me.  After a long search we found the target bird, Rufous-fronted Prinia.  Before finding these birds we located a whitethroat that we identified as a Lesser.  I did not think I had seen one in the past so we noted the field marks for later review.  Leaving the area we flushed a pipit that flew away but another darker bird remained.  At first we thought another pipit perhaps tawny. But the bill was wrong.  We got our thoughts together and came up with thrush.  The bird flew but only a short distance onto a large rock.  We got good looks and noted the field marks.  Only two real possibilities but we needed to check the book.  The bird was a juvenile Tickell’s Thrush.

We had been looking for a bulbul at the research area without luck.  Nikhil put a phone call into a friend who teaches at Nehru University.  He had two locations where he had seen the bird recently.  He checked out the areas and the birds were present.  But first we needed lunch.  Since McDonald’s was old hat by now, we chose to eat Italian.  Nikhil had gone to supper last night with a friend from the US at an Italian restaurant.  He made me hungry for pasta so on to an office complex were there was a wide choice of restaurants.  We chose Prego’s.

 

After lunch and a little street shopping we were off to the campus and we met up with Nikhil’s friend.  Within a few minutes, five White-eared Bulbuls put in an appearance as promised.  First the birds were in a bad backlit situation, then into full sunlight for “cracking” views as some friends say.

Nikhil said we were through, he knew of no locations nearby for birds on my want list, so the tour was over, but first we needed ice cream to celebrate.  Yes, Chris, we finally had ice cream.

Final count, twenty one new birds in two days.

34, May 2015
thumb_02_60_60 Name

@sub-heading

“I use Testimonial Generator often. Great job, I will definitely be ordering again! I’m good to go. ”
12, Aug 2015
thumb_03_60_60 Name

@sub-heading

“I use Testimonial Generator often. Great job, I will definitely be ordering again! I’m good to go. ”
1, Apr 2015

Twelve Makes a Dozen

On 29 and 30 November 2012, I had two of the greatest days of birding near Delhi, India.  I had four days between a Birding Ecotours trip to Bhutan and Assam, India, and a Rockjumper tour to Northern India.  I asked Chris Lotz, Birding Ecotours, to arrange a couple of days birding with a local guide.  Chris suggested his ground agent, Nikhil Devasar, Enchanted India.  What a great choice.  Nikhil arranged for me to stay at the Express Sarovar Portico, Surajkund, Delhi NCR.  He picked me up at 0600 on 29 November and we headed for Gurgaon.  I was in good hands.  As we left the main road south, Nikhil asked if I liked Neil Diamond and I replied “yes.”  He punched a few buttons and out from the speakers came “Sweet Caroline.”  He did not know that the Boston Red Sox baseball team plays that song at the bottom of the eighth inning. A tradition most sox fans might consider a rally song (except for last year – but I digress).  We turned into the parking lot at National Park Sultanpur.  We were met by his local guide, Sunjay.  After paying the foreigner entry ticket and parking (50 rupees), I received Book No. 418, Ticket No. 000001 which might have been an omen.  We walked about 100 yards and found a Brook’s Leaf Warbler that has a flycatcher type foraging habit.  About another 100 yards later, Nikhil found a small flock of Sind Sparrow, a recent arrival near Delhi with a few small isolated flocks in the area.  We than walked around a large pond and Sunjay found a White-tailed Lapwing.  Just for good measure a Common Snipe worked out behind the lapwing, not a lifer but the best view of a bird usually seen flying away.  It was about 0730 and we were back in the car.  From here, I have no idea of the locations visited; however, we were at one point 200 miles from Delhi.

Next stop was in a small village were the Bank Myna was along the roadside.  The first one was beside a Common Myna for good comparison.  A short distance later, Nikhil found a Brown Rock (Indian) Chat that flew up on a roof and quickly disappeared from view.  Minutes later we had a few on roadside wires.  We then traveled a few kilometers and turned into a cultivated area.  Nikhil spotted a Desert Wheatear.  He thought I t was not on my want list but he was mistaken.  We were looking for the Variable Wheatear in the same location.  We found this bird a few minutes later.  Two new wheatears located in the same set of plowed ground.  The next bird proved a little harder.  We drove up on a partially constructed bridge approach for a future road.  We searched but could not locate the bird.  Driving down the edge of the ramp and onto the existing highway, Nikhil spotted a raptor being mobbed by crows.  A quick turn onto a farm road.  We located the raptor sitting in a tree with several crows around it.  A Long-legged Buzzard showed fine in the tree then left to go to the area of the bridge approach from which we had just left.

After about an hour drive including a stop to purchase a cooking item for Shelly Bell (and a couple for me), we turned onto a side road.  Nikhil stopped the car and said, “Look on the top of the abandoned building.  The building was about ten feet high with a flat roof of twenty by fifty feet.  I looked like many of the chicken raising buildings we saw on the way.  There, sitting under the branch of a tree, was an Indian Stone Curlew.  At the side of the building under the same tree were two or three more.  I crossed the street to get a view onto the roof using a water storage tank for elevation.  I counted eight more curlews on the roof.  Nikhil thought there were probably thirty at this location.

Another drive found us at a bridge over a deep canal.  The berm was twenty feet above the water level with the width perhaps fifty feet.   Sunjay walked ahead and talked with a goat herder.  Shortly, a large brown bird crossed the canal.  Nikhil told me to watch the canal as the bird usually fly just above the water.  This bird might have seen us standing on the berm.  Instead of flying along the water, it flew behind trees on the opposite shore.  I saw the bird cross the canal and got looks as it passed.  It was a big owl now called the Rock Eagle Owl.  Sunjay flushed another that behaved properly, flying down the canal.  It landed in a large tree and stayed while we got scope views of it.  A great sight.

We drove many miles then made a turn onto a road beside an irrigation canal. I heard Nikhil and Sunjay mention grass and I thought they were talking about a grassbird, which I had not seen.  We left the car and walked a few feet when Nikhil said there is another new bird for me.  It was not a grassbird, rather a Streaked Weaver.  We walked a few more yards and down the embankment looking for the next bird.  Nikhil found it and again I expected a grassbird, but instead only saw a prinia.  There were Ashy and Plain Prinia about the edge of the grasses, but I still expected a grassbird.  The bird I saw was a prinia but not one of the two I had previously mentioned.  This bird was a little smaller than the other two.  While I was expecting a grassbird, the new bird was a Graceful Prinia.

We returned to National Park Sultanpur to drop off Sunjay.  A great day of birding and it was just after 1300.  Nikhil said there were no new birds for me in the area, we swept the board clean. Nikhil asked where I wanted to go for lunch.  I mentioned McDonald’s.  He said “OK.”  Later we actually drove to a three or four story shopping mall and there was the McDonald’s.   A great day of birding was capped by a visit to Mickey D’s.  It does not get any better.  But there was the next day.

Nikhil picked me up at 0715 and we headed toward the center of Delhi.  We crossed a river and went into the entrance of a bird sanctuary.   I have a piece of paper that says “Foreigner Ticket” that cost 350 rupees, but I cannot read any of the other words in Hindi.  Nikhil stopped the car a few hundred yards along the bank of the river/marsh and said there is your next bird.  On a transmission pylon was a Barbary Falcon, the only one known to be in the Delhi area.  We drove to the end of the road and parked.  We walked down to the reed bed and Nikhil said there is your next new bird.  It looked like a large grassbird, yes; it was still on my mind.  A grassbird with a ratty tail turned out to be a Striated Babbler.  The next bird took a long time to find.  As we walked along the path in the reeds, the footing got very muddy and we were not able to go to the normal location for the bird.  We walked additional paths, scanning the top of the reeds.  We ended up at a rickety watchtower that gave us a view of the marsh.  I was able to locate a female on the top of the reeds.  It was the White-tailed Stonechat that we were searching for.  Was it luck or good guiding?

When we got back to the car, Nikhil asked if I wanted to go on a wild goose chase.  I had no goose on my want list but I asked why not, perhaps it will be the grassbird. We drove onto an area where sand extraction was occurring.  Not your normal sand pit, rather an unorganized group of small operations with manpower rather than machines.  I did not see a pay loader anywhere.  Nikhil told me this area was the best place to see shorebirds on the mud flats in the river and along the shore.  Today, it is a dump.  We were looking for Sand Lark, and right in the midst of big trucks and many workers we found two, perhaps the last holdouts from days gone by.

We then visited a research area near my hotel.  It is a thorn forest with rock outcrops.  This area is the only such habitat near Delhi.  We flushed a pair of Painted Sandgrouse that landed a short distance away so we could get another look.  It turns out to be a new bird for me.  After a long search we found the target bird, Rufous-fronted Prinia.  Before finding these birds we located a whitethroat that we identified as a Lesser.  I did not think I had seen one in the past so we noted the field marks for later review.  Leaving the area we flushed a pipit that flew away but another darker bird remained.  At first we thought another pipit perhaps tawny. But the bill was wrong.  We got our thoughts together and came up with thrush.  The bird flew but only a short distance onto a large rock.  We got good looks and noted the field marks.  Only two real possibilities but we needed to check the book.  The bird was a juvenile Tickell’s Thrush.

We had been looking for a bulbul at the research area without luck.  Nikhil put a phone call into a friend who teaches at Nehru University.  He had two locations where he had seen the bird recently.  He checked out the areas and the birds were present.  But first we needed lunch.  Since McDonald’s was old hat by now, we chose to eat Italian.  Nikhil had gone to supper last night with a friend from the US at an Italian restaurant.  He made me hungry for pasta so on to an office complex were there was a wide choice of restaurants.  We chose Prego’s.

 

After lunch and a little street shopping we were off to the campus and we met up with Nikhil’s friend.  Within a few minutes, five White-eared Bulbuls put in an appearance as promised.  First the birds were in a bad backlit situation, then into full sunlight for “cracking” views as some friends say.

Nikhil said we were through, he knew of no locations nearby for birds on my want list, so the tour was over, but first we needed ice cream to celebrate.  Yes, Chris, we finally had ice cream.

Final count, twenty one new birds in two days.

Nikhil Devasar’s website is enchantedindia.com and his email is nikhil@enchantedindia.com.  His mobile phone is 9810008625.

William Tucket

 

 

 

 

WILLIAM TUCKER

BIRDER